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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr., i am pleased to be joined by dr. clayborne carson, the director of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this day, we do not just celebrate the legacy and life of dr. king, but the first african-american president inaugurated for the second time? >> there is so much to celebrate on this day and so much to remember about the part of king's dream that has not been fulfilled. particularly the issue of poverty. there are so many things that make us thankful that the civil- rights reforms were achieved. i think it is important, particularly on this day, to remember that, if king were around, he would be pushing us to deal with that have -- that pestering issue of poverty. tavis: why is it that you think that, with all the evidence supporting the notion that pozner -- the poverty is threatening our democracy, it is a matter of national security, one out of two ameri
the memory of dr. martin luther king jr. this weekend, we cap off the 10th anniversary week by revisiting our conversation with a civil rights icon in her own right, coretta scott king. back in 2005, we traveled to atlanta for a very special program with miss king at the famed ebenezer baptist church, the church that was home base for dr. king during much of the civil rights movement. a conversation which would turn out to be one of her last on national television. we're glad you could join us to wrap up this 10th anniversary week with a conversation with coretta scott king, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we kick off our second season in 2005, we could
and school lunch, but forget about school breakfast. i think about the legacy of martin luther king -- if i can dip into that strong tradition and think about what he said, let us be dissatisfied. divine dissatisfaction with what is going on with this country in terms of our education system, but definitely with hunger. the fact that we have 50 million americans who live in food in secure homes, hungry holmes, last year. the majority were homes that had young children. if you think about it, one in four young children with an america under the age of six is suffering from food insecurity. we know that affects their childhood development. we know increases hospitalization rates. it costs us an enormous amount, not only socially, and human suffering, but economic suffering in terms of the health-care consequences and costs. long before a child even crosses the threshold of kindergarten, that child is potentially truncated because they are food insecure, they are hungry, their families to not have enough money for food. i went to pick back up on you, congressman gingrich -- when you say our pr
. martin luther king was under surveillance. the government can violate your rights. we need that sensibility. governments can use their power to support corporate elites. they come together not just politically but economically. let me say this. martin luther king, jr., could be taken to jail without due process or judicial process because he had a connection with a freedom fighter who was called a terrorist named nelson mandela. he just got off the terrorist list in 2008. he had a relation to a terrorist, and under the present administration you can assassinate americans. you can take them to jail with out due process. we have got a black political prisoners right now in america, and they are in their becausee their love was such they are willing to tell the truth. that is a threat. we do not talk about them. that is what the culture of fear is not just silence. people are afraid. they are afraid to lose their jobs. you cannot have a culture of fear and generate a movement. justice will soon generate into something less than justice. we have to talk about love. martin was a
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)